X

Scanned from the collection of David Pierce

Coordinated by the Media History Digital Library www.mediahistoryproject.org

Funded by a donation from John McElwee

Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2014

https://archive.org/details/exhibitorsherald94quig

r

I

1

Field Open to All Quality Sound Devices

EXHIBITORS

RALD

-G-M PUTS THE JOY IN LIFE!

THE BUNK

IN

6 REELS

And the folks ask you when you're going to have another big one like "Ben-Hur" and "The Big Paradt

A'

When you watch the crowds stay away in droves and you wonder what the future can possibly hold

A

—And then comes M-G-M's "THE TRAIL OF '98" with more spectacle in it than "Big Parade" and "Ben-Hur" combined —And you get behind it with smashing showmanship And the folks come packing your Show Shop— And the money pours in— Hotsy! Totsy! Isn't it the truth that M-G-M aluays puts the Joy in Life!

And you feel that a really Giant Picture would sure pep things up for vou

5 U.

Metro

►ID

toy.

M

Ay

' iole Vol 94. No. I (Vol. Jb. So. 4 .

Entered as secoud-class matter. August 2". /«/," at ike Host Ulftce at Chicago. III., u-uier the act of March J, IS7<* Published at 407 South Dearborn St.. -*ca. Subscription SS-00 a tear Single cofies ?f cents

lami.irv

A NEW YEAR'S MESSAGE TO PRODUCERS AND DISTRIBUTORS:

(JFor economical distribution, pictures must be at least two-thirds sold before the salesman calls at the theatre.

In advance of the salesman's call for sound, wasteless and effec- tive selling there must be supplied a detailed and comprehensive campaign of information, facts and reasons for claims which will be asserted.

Every exhibitor has the right to demand that he shall be supplied in advance of the salesman's call with sufficient information about product, personalities and showmanship angles to enable him to deal knowingly and intelligently with the salesman.

Every exhibitor does demand this right and distributors who fail to recognize it pay the penalty in lower grosses and higher sell- ing costs.

4|The HERALD-WORLD is the proven best medium for informing all of the exhibitors everywhere about product; its editorial pages acquaint the exhibitors with the latest news of the industry gen- erally and its product, together with sound guidance on the latest and best in showmanship methods.

Its advertising pages afford specific information on specific product to the end of more successful buying for the exhibitor and more successful selling at lower costs for the distributor.

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY.

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

PARAMOUNT

offers the greatest array of important box office product SOUND and SILENT ever released in one single month in the history of pictures!

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

INTERFERENCE and

ALL-TALKING UNIT. First great quality 100% talking feature. Straight from $2 S.R.O. run at Criterion, N. Y. Evelyn Brent, Clive Brook, William Powell, Doris Kenyon. Directed by Roy J. Pomeroy. Based on Mendes Production. Plus EDDIE CANTOR in screaming short. Plus RUTH ETTING, Ziegfeld beauty and blues singer. The feature picture,

iiInterference'>'>, also available as fine silent picture.

Anne Nichols9

"ABIE'S IRISH ROSE

The most successful stage hit of all times! Now a quality Paramount sound picture. With Jean Hersholt talking. Nancy Carroll singing and dancing. Charles "Buddy" Rogers playing the piano. Victor Fleming Production. Marvelous music score. Triumphant pre-release engagements in Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and San Francisco. Also available silent.

THE

CASE of LENA SMITH"

One of 1929's dramatic sensations! With Esther Ralston and James Hall. Directed by Josef von Sternberg, the man who made "Underworld", "The Dragnet" and "Docks of New York". Adolph Zukor wires personally from Holly wood : "Another von Sternberg triumph. Miss Ralston's greatest performance by far". Silent picture only.

i

"THE

SHOPWOBN ANGEL"

With Nancy Carroll and Gary Cooper. Richard Wallace Production. Synchronized with music score and sound effects. One reel all-talking. Flashy, tender, grippingly dramatic every element for a great box office attraction. Miss Carroll singing "A Precious Little Thing Called Love", sure to be one of the song hits of ail times. Also available silent.

]

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS H ERALD -WORLD

5

the DOCTOR'S SECRET

AXD ALL-TALKIXG UNIT. A 100 c talking feature picture from J. M. Barrie's celebrated stage hit, "Half : an Hour". With Ruth Chatterton, H. B. Warner, John Loder, Robert Edeson. Directed by William de Mille. Plus BORR.AH MLNNEYITCH and his Musical Rascals in de luxe jazz short. Plus "JUST ONE WORD", novelty playlet produced by Joseph Santley. Sound picture only.

REHIND THE GERMAN LINES

Jirect from successful long run at Rialto Theatre, N. Y. German war secrets from behind the lines revealed for first time

I.'-

n official film photographed in actual battles. Ufa Production. Synchronized with great music score and effects. Also nailable silent.

SHORT FEATURES

lie class of the market ! BOBBY VERNON in "Why Gorillas Leave Home". BILLY DOOLEY in "Happy Heels". "aramount-Christie Comedies. Two releases each of the popular KRAZY KAT and INKWELL IMPS Carbons. Two ssues weekly of PARAMOUNT NEWS, the industry's leading news reel.

NATIONAL NEWS-

campaign starting January 1st in 700

PAPER ADVERTISING

tewspapers in 400 key cities, reaching iCO:000,000 readers! Containing name and date of theatre playing "Interference"'. Idling Paramount's amazing talking picture pro^-'m to audiences in advance.

(paramount (pictures

HEADQUARTERS

1929 MOTION

a GRAND opening

"Christmas day was the anniversary day of the founding of Fox Films, and that hardy organization earned double felicitations by giving to the amusement world a remarkable proof of its high standing in the realm of picture drama, in Old Arizona' gives by far the best demonstration of the speaking screen ever put forth. Clear, vibrant, un- forced, the speech of the characters came startlingly close to that which had be- hind it the breath of life, in Old Arizona'is nothing short of triumphant. It advances the art of the talkies dis- tinctly ahead of any rival attempt."

Monroe Lathrop,

Los Angeles Express

" in Old Arizona' is a breezy romance. It is a col- orful narrative, with excel- lent playing by Baxter.Lowe and Dorothy Burgess, and the charm that a Spanish accent lends to the dialog."

Llewellyn Miller,

Los Angeles Record

IN OLD RIZON

wrecks house record at

WORLD PREMIERE

CRITERION

Theatre

•os Angeles

WILLIAM FOX

presents

" in Old Arizona' is not only infinitely better than the usual crop of films, but it is significant because it is the first outdoor talkie and really the first one to combine the technique o the screen and the stage and the first one to mak me forget the mechanics sound device. It has all th< gentle satire and irony o that great short stor writer, O. Henry, and th stretch of desert country i so gorgeous and the moun tainous country so effectiv that you would be conten just to look at some of the magnificent scenic effects. Warner Baxter as the bandit has never been seen in aj portrayal that is presented with so much feeling. Edmund Lowe is again a hardboiled sergeant the same kind that won him plaudits in 'What Price Glory.' Dorothy Burgess performance of Tonia Maris is a classic. There is credit enough for both Raou Walsh and Irving Cum mings for the direction o:

THE FIRST ALL-TALKING

with EDMUND LOWE < DOROTHY BURGESS

WARNER BAXTER

T

i roving beyond all doubt thalk

that Wrecked Records, and made the Critics Rave

he picture. Take my advice md see 'In Old Arizona.' It s well worth your time and noney."

Louella Parsons, Los Angeles Examiner

'In Old Arizona' is the irst big outdoor talkie and surprising disclosure of vhat can be done with a nicrophone in the open air. t presents a sort of 'What 5rice Glory' story with vestern trimmings. One hing that it absolutely as- ures is a different sort of how than has ever been en at any time before. For his reason 'In Old Arizona' ^jvill perhaps in days to come >e reckoned as epochal. The ?oice of Warner Baxter reg Jl Asters notably well. Dorothy

If ft

,3urgess finds herself quite

icclimated to this sirenic l%le. Edmund Lowe amuses

vjlt-

L vith his portrayal of a hard- boiled soldier."

Edwin Schallert, Los Angeles Times

IN OLD RIZON

is just the start!

5 more 100%

ALL-TALKING FULL-LENGTH FEATURES

now ready or in production:

The Ghost Talks Hearts In Dixie The Valiant Speakeasy hru Different Eyes

" 'In Old Arizona' moves. It is exciting. Its dialog is well written. Its voices are well recorded and its play- ers walk about in an unself- consciousway. It is destined to please many audiences and to win over converts for the talkies. Nor should its gorgeous backgrounds be forgotten."

-Harrison Carroll,

Los Angeles Herald

"This production is of un- usual merit. Expertly cast with the speaking princi- pals all boasting of past stage experience has in- sured the talking perfection of the drama. The dialog has been well handled by the players. They have worked up a perfect climax which is guaranteed to hold the spectators' interest."

Harry Mines,

Los Angeles Daily News

FEATURE FILMED OUTDOORS

ZONA

Directed RAOUL WAbSH ond Story and aiAu daddy in Dialog by IRVING CUMMINGS Dialog by 1 UM " At"* 1

^|

tfROVIETONE talkers talk profits 9

8

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

DRAMAPHONE

of!

==i:r.=r-

„„.»o cos"-"0 -

A SOUND INVESTMENT

DRAMAPHONE talking and sound projection equipment comes to you not as an ex- periment . . . but as a tried and proved product.

DRAMAPHONE synchronized talking and sound equipment is the product and brains of. the most capable electrical and mechanical engineers in the country.

DRAMAPHONE projection equipment has already proved itself in actual test by ex- hibitors.

INSTALLATIONS are being made daily.

SOUND projection equipment cannot be judged without seeing and hearing . . . you must see and hear the DRAMAPHONE ... it will surprise you by its performance as well as its low cost.

Come to Chicago or see our nearest distributor . . . see and hear this remarkable instrument. If distance forbids wire or write us for complete information.

Drama phone Corporation

422 South Wabash Ave., ChiYago, Illinois

Distributors.

Telephone Wabash 8473

L & M Distributing Co., 2621 Vine St., Cincinnati, Ohio Schlank-Henigson, 6912 Hollywood Bh Hollywood, Calif. Dramaphone Distributing Corp., 1506 Davenport St., Omaha, Neb.

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

- and How

MELODY OF LOVE

Carl Laemmle's 100% Talking Picture.

THE LAST WARNING

Laura La Plante. Paul Leni Production.

GIVE AND TAKE

George Sidney, Jean Hersholt. Wm. Beaudine Production.

THE CHARLATAN

George Melford Production.

COHENS AND KELLYS in ATLANTIC CITY

George Sidney, Vera Gordon, Kate Price, Mack Swain. Wm. J. Craft Production.

THE SHAKEDOWN

James Murray, Barbara Kent. Wm. Wyler Production.

COME ACROSS

Mary Nolan. Wm. Wyler Production.

RED HOT SPEED

Reginald Denny. Joseph Henabery Production.

HIS LUCKY DAY

Reginald Denny. Directed by Edward CUne.

IT CAN BE DONE

Glenn Tryon. Fred Newmeyer Production.

GIRL on the BARGE

By Rupert Hughes. Jean Hersholt, Sally O'Neil, Malcolm McGregor. Edward Sloman Production.

BARGAIN IN

THE KREMLIN

By Sir Philip Gibbs. Joseph Schildkraut. Directed by Edward Sloman.

THE CLIMAX

From famous play by Edward Locke.

CLEAR THE DECKS THE GREAT

CINEMA MURDER

By Leonard Fields.

Reginald Denny. A. Joseph Henabery Production.

THAT BLONDE

Laura La Plante.

ONE RAINY NIGHT

Laura La Plante.

DANGEROUS

DIMPLES

Laura La Plante.

FLAMING

DAUGHTERS

By Beatrice Van.

BARNUM

WAS RIGHT

From play by Philip Bartholomae, John Meehan.

YOU CANT

f HTJ:0VE THE HAUNTED

An Ernst Laemmle Production.

LONESOME

Paul Fejos' Masterpiece. Glenn Tryon, Barbara Kent.

BROADWAY

Paul Fejos Production. Original play dialogue.

THE MINSTREL

SHOW

Eddie Leonard.

THE KING OF JAZZ

Paul Whiteman

SHANNONS OF

BROADWAY

with James Gleason. Directed by WesLy Ruggles.

LADY

By AJela Rogers St. John.

THE BRAGGART

Jean Hersholt. Edward Sloman Production.

ERIC THE GREAT

Conrad Veidt, Mary Philbin. Paul Fejos Production.

SHORT SUBJECTS

BAILEY and BARNUM, THE THREE BROX SISTERS, ZIM- MERMAN and GRAND VILLE. "THE COLLEGIANS" Fourth Series. Supervised by Carl Laemmle, Jr.

(Note : Two negatives, sound and silent, on all Universal talking pic- tures excepting "Melody of Love.")

StUnt or Sound- Cart Laemmle leads the Way///_

10

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

NOW OVEK 200 FEK MONTH!

That's the way theaters all over the eountry are installing Phototone Sight- Sound Pol lev

T:

|HE seven hundred theaters now using Phototone are getting the crowds with "sight-sound" programs. And they didn't pay $11,000 for the equipment. It'll pay you to get on the "sight- sound" bandwagon with them especially since you can do it for only $500.

That's all Phototone costs with baffle board and dynamic cone speaker. It is $575 with two baffle board speakers and with cue cabinet con- taining fifty records and fifty filing devices. All the sound effects and themes you can use for all the situations in your bookings. Music by the world's greatest orchestras.

Now's your chance to start packing the crowds in for real honest-to-goodness "sight -sound" programs. Beat your competitor to it.

I^OR small annual cost you can equip your theater with Photo- tone's new cue and record service. This gives you a circulat- ing lihrary of sound records made exclusively for Phototone also standard records for incidental use, and special noise records such as mob sounds, growls, shrieks, sirens, etc.

By means of this new sound service your Phototone disc li- brary will be replenished with cue service made up by thcThemalic Music Cue Service of New York, which is also writing original scores for Phototone.

Mail the eoupon. Get the details.

Check the information you want and mail this coupon to the Phototone Company, North Vernon, Ind.

Record Cue Service Phototone Equipment

NAME

ADDRESS -

COMPANY CITY

STATE.

Be sure and hear the new Phototone cone sound board speaker

"31 Broadway, New York, N. Y. i Vine St., Philadelphia, Pa. '"orbes St., Pittsburgh, Pa.

The new Phototone cone sound board is clear and distinct built for long hard service

Phototone Branch Offices

Neil Thompson, Argos, Ind. 220 W. Fourth St., Charlotte, N. C.

(for Indianapolis and Cleveland) 845 S. Wabash Ave.. Chicago, 111.

.'{27 E. Sixth St., Cincinnati, Ohio 3706 Broadway, K-- isas City, Mo.

705 W. Crand Ave., Oklahoma, City, Okla. 5332 Chicago Ave., Minneapolis, Minn. Phil Pierce Company, Dallas, Texas

E YOUR PII T1REK WITH THE WORLD'S GREATEST MUSIC

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS HERALD -WORLD

II

The Great American Picture Breaking All American Records!

Showmen Everywhere Report Huge Grosses and Satisfied Patrons Who Enthusiastically Spread Praise for "Uncle Tom"

The Capitol Theatre, Dallas, Tex., wires: "'Uncle Tom' good for ten days more. Ex- pect to make up all Summer losses with it." From Charles F. Smith, of the Uptown Theatre, Kansas City, comes: "Just completed week of tremendous business on 'Uncle Tom.' All records smashed." Then R. D. Hutchinson wires from the Liberty Theatre, Oklahoma City, Okla. : "Very happy advise necessary hold over 'Uncle Tom' for second week. Did tremendous business." Vogel Gettier, of the Capitol Theatre, Grand Island, Neb., has this to say: "'Uncle Tom' has broken all records in its first three-day showing, topping year's best supers." From Kane, Pa.— the Chase Street Theatre— comes: " 'Uncle Tom' is Universale screen masterpiece. Opened to record-breaking business despite heavy opposition." "Had plenty of competition, but they couldn't lick 'Uncle Tom's Cabin,'" says L. S. Braun, of the New Square Theatre, Ottumwa, la., "Now we know Universal has the big ones." Frank C. Reinecke, of the Paramount Theatre, Akron, Ohio, declares: "I have seen a lot of big pictures and I have played a lot of big pictures, but beyond any ques- tion of doubt 'Uncle Tom' is the biggest and best box-office sensation that has ever been released by any distributor." From White, S. D., comes the message, signed by K. Cum- mings, of the Opera House: "Wonderful picture in every respect. Better than I thought it could be or would be. I wish all the so-called specials were as good." R. W. Mussleman, of the Princess Theatre Lincoln, Kansas, writes: "'Uncle Tom's Cabin' is a wonderful

g picture. Drew in -people that I had never seen in town before." e Palm Theatre, Pueblo, Colo., says: "Just completed sensa- om.' Business phenomenal. Biggest seven days ever done." Keith Theatre, North Platte, Neb. , writes : " I wish to say t more comment from patrons than any picture ever played exhibitor anywhere that I believe 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' to 11 the so-called specials, and that their patrons all will be ney's Theatre, Point Marruon, Penn., says: "This my fell you 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' just established a record eyond all conception." A wire from Charles F. Smith, 'heatre, Wichita, Kansas, states: "Just closing week Cabin.' All records smashed. Despite change of d special performance at nine thirty, this morning

emmle leads the Way///

drawing card an while ti

12

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

The NEW company

with a NEW idea

Exhibitor's Choice Selling Begins this month

Photoplays made where/tKe story's laid

PICTURES ACTUALLY PRODUCED IN EUROPE ASM

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

13

INCORPORATED

THE NEW YQ§K

pT"5L!: LIBRARY

4231294

ASrOR, I.ZXOX AND TILOEN r J JNDATIOMS R 19C9 L

IMPORTERS and DISTRIBUTORS

Throughout the United States and Canada

A Statement of Purpose and Policy

IT IS THE purpose and ambition of the foun- ders of this Company to make it the North American Clearing House for the representa- tive films of other countries. We invite all overseas producers to investigate our distribu- tion facilities.

The company is managed by American show- men whose knowledge of production progress abroad has convinced them that overseas pro- ducers are now making enough pictures which will pay in the United States and Canada to justify a nation-wide distributing organization devoted exclusively to their exploitation. It is the first and only national distributing com- pany to specialize in imported pictures exclu- sively.

There is real box-office and entertainment value in "photoplays made where the story's laid." Good pictures from other countries, the romances of the peoples of distant lands, will afford an occasional welcome change from the usual domestic pictures.

We will import only those pictures which have quality, novelty, unusual stories and char-

acters, authentic and beautiful locations and backgrounds pictures which could not as well be made in America.

We will handle only those pictures which after screen examination are approved for this market by a selection committee composed of men and women both in and out of the picture business.

We will deal only in completed pictures. We will sell one or more pictures at a time. Ex- hibitors may see any picture before booking it.

Bcause we believe it will be more profitable to exhibitors and ourselves and in the long run to overseas producers of high-grade prod- uct, we prefer handling a limited number of good pictures annually to dealing in a larger number of cheaper but less attractive ones.

Aside from the commercial, we believe the entertainment, cultural and educational values of fine imported pictures will prove a worthy contribution to the screens of the new world. Those motion pictures, wherever made, which entertainingly mirror humanity's progress will win their way everywhere.

JOS. S. SKIRBOLL

Sales Manager

J. D. WILLIAMS

Executive Vice President

AL S. ARONSON

European Representative

^VERY REQIII S

SOUND

it's News !

Some Outstanding News Events Recorded

PRESIDENT ELECT HOOVER arrives in San Pedro, Calif., to board warship Maryland for South American trip.

AIMEE SEMPLE McPHERSON greeted by happy thou- sands on her return to Los Angeles from Europe.

FRANZ SHUBERT Centenary at Vienna. World tribute on 100th anniversary of great composer's death.

YOKOHAMA Prayers to Ossaniyama, Guardian God of Yokohama, chanted in old religious rite.

Its Entertainment

CHORUS CUTIES make big whoopee for old sea-salts at old sailors home, St. George, Staten Island.

DE WOLF HOPPER— who put "Mudville" on the map with "Casey at the Bat," makes a back-stage confession exposing his career.

TOM NOONAN of the "Church in Overalls" in New York's famous Chinatown, demonstrates how he rescues the city's souls in pawn.

KIDS JAZZ BAND in Boston take up kindergarden course

in syncopation.

PATHEJMWNEW

te of a Great News Reel

NEWS is real news when it's of universal interest and NEW. ENTERTAINMENT has value when it is hall-marked with Show- manship. SOUND enhances news when it achieves perfection in recording and reproduction.

First page news when it is news— plus big time entertainment plus absolute verity in sound recording and reproduction . . . THIS IS YOUI GUARANTEE when you book THE WORLD'? GREATEST NEWS REEL IN SOUND! H

Its sound at its best!

PATHE SOUND NEWS is the last word in production flexibility both in sound and scene.

The "variable area" sound track of RCA Photophone System gives results not available to any other system.

Absolute elimination of ground noises and other sound track disturbances is accomplished by recording on fine-grained Dupont positive film stock in a sepa- rate simultaneous operation while making the picture negative. Long shots and close-ups can be irade by Pathe Sound News without sacrificing SOUND or PICTORIAL quality.

Picture* j/

NOW COMBINED

for the Greater Glory of your Box-Office !

1

THE GREATEST MIRACLE IN 1928 YEARS

Now add the living voice of VITA- PHONE first, finest, and most fa- mous of all Sound accomplishments to the supreme Star, Story, and Production values of FIRST NA- TIONAL PICTURES . . .

Never has such a staggering sum of Box-Office Assets been placed before the exhibitors of motion pictures! First National Players so popular you can fill your theatre on their names alone . . . First National Stories so stupendous you'd grab them, Vita- phone or SILENT . . .

ADD TO THESE THE TREMEN- DOUS FORCE OF VITAPHONE, AND YOU HAVE A BUY

THAT'S IRRESISTIBLE!

Beginning immediately, every new First National Picture that is put in work will be produced via Vitaphone. Every time you book a First National Picture you can advertise a Vita- phone Picture!

* * *

In the minds of America's millions, "Sound" IS "Vitaphone".

In the hearts of America's millions, First National Pictures and First Na- tional Stars have been rooted deep by 1 1 years of glorious achievement.

By their union First National attains the Pinnacle of Box-Office Power!

Blow every FIRST NATIONAL PICTURE will be a 100% YlfAPtDNE PICTURE!

t 1

When Stars like these Speak Via Vitaphone, the Whole World will Listen !

Colleen Moore

Corinne Griffith

' Richard Barthelmess

Billie Dove

*5

Jack Mulhali

Every First National Star now a Vitaphone

Star!

^

AMONG

N. V

Tim"

AUTD STIIX The PROOF PIL.ES UP!

New critics swell the flood of testimony that "THE BARKER' is a once -in- a 'blue moon hit!

"Carthay Circle audience ac- claimed 'The Barker.' Sets new precedent for players among cast. Fitzmaurice has stepped into group of few who have something really good to offer." Louella Par- sons in L. A. Examiner

" 'The Barker' is the most in- teresting picture silent or noisy on Broadway." Karl Kitchen in N. Y. Eve. World

"Excellent picture and a good talker. Will waltz home to a merry jingle. Picture is well supplied with 'it'." Sid in Variety

"'Barker' real entertainment. Marvelous carnival atmos- phere. Accorded place in front rank. Picture must be reckoned unquestionably among outstanding film achievements of year." Marquis Busby in L. A. Times.

"A natural. One of note- worthy photoplays of year. 'The Barker' should be put on your list of pictures not to be missed." Monrot Lathrop, L. A. Express.

'The Barker' offers colorfu entertainment. Unusual in terest. Has not been surpassec by any recent picture."— Har rison Caroll in L. A. Herald

"First National 'Barker' pre miere display stuns Wesl Coast boulevardiers. A spec tacle that out-rivaled any thing the' motion pictur< capital had ever seen." En Daily Review.

The Independent Film Trade Paper

EXHIBITORS

H E RALD WORLD

Home Office: 407 So. Dearborn St. Chicago

IN THIS ISSUE

Film field is now open for all sound devices having quality; understanding for interchange is reached by licensees of Western Electric; future of audiens depends upon maintenance and im- provement of standard, says Otterson; cause of the talking picture declared lost if producers, exhibitors or manufacturers accept standard lower than now established.

COMPLETE INDEX TO CONTENTS

NEWS

Campaign for decent name for talking pictures progresses far beyond expectations; names pour in from all parts of country. Woodhull challenges Allied to give stand on admitting chains; declares growth of MPTO A both "satisfactory and safe."

Prosperity is sure to continue into new year, says Klein First seven World Wide pictures go to exhibitors this month.

Lee Marcus is elected vice-president of FBO; Rozenzweig is general sales manager F N announces impressive list of all- audiens.

FEATURES

Service Talks by T. 0. Service 53

Los Angeles by Douglas Hodges 42

Pictorial Section 31

Quick Reference Picture Chart 54

Letters from Readers 58

Broadway 26

DEPARTMENTS

Sound Pictures 36

The Studio 41

Short Features 44

Presentation Acts 45

The Theatre 50

Classified Advertising 57

Chicago Personalities by J. F 66

ADVERTISEMENTS

FILM, SOUND AND EQUIPMENT— Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, East- man Kodak, Fox, Paramount, Dramaphone, Universal, Phototone, World Wide Pictures, Pathe, First National, Murad, Movie-Phone Corporation, Irving Hamlin, Exhibitors Record Service, Milton M. Stern.

PRESENTATIONS— Leo Feist, Inc., Donaldson, Douglas and Gumble, Inc., Sunshine Sammy, Johnny Payne, L. Carlos Meier, New York Costume Company, Ransley Brooks Costumes.

CHICAGO

407 South Dearborn St. Telephone Harrison 0036-37-38

Ca bis Address : Quigpubco EDWIN S. CLIFFORD, General Manager JAY M. SHRECK, Managing Editor GEORGE CLIFFORD, Business Manager ERNEST A. ROVELSTAD, Netes Editor LOS ANGELBS

S617 Hollywood Bird. Telephone Gladstone 37S4

DOUGLAS HODGES West Coast Manager

EDITORIAL AND ADVERTISING OFFICES

NEW YORK

565 Fifth Avenue Telephone VanderbUt 3612-3613

PETER VISCHER, ;Ve» York Editor JAMES BEE CROFT, .Vew York Advertising Manager

LONDON THE BIOSCOPE (J. Cabourn, Editor") Faraday House 8-10 Charing Cross Rd., W. C. 2

SUBSCRIPTION RATES : United States and its possessions, Canada and all countries of the Americas $3.00 per year; Great Britain and Its colonies £1 per utner foreign countries per year. Single copies 25 cents. Advertising rale cards and Audit Bureau of Circulations statements famished npon eppUeatien.

I

J

20

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS

H E RALD WORLD

Martin J. Quigley, Publisher & Editor

Incorporating Exhibitors Herald, founded in 1915; Moving Pic- ture World, founded in 1907; Motography, founded in 1909; and The Film Index, founded in 1909 Published Every Wednesday by

Quigley Publishing Company

Publication Office: 407 So. Dearborn St., CHICAGO, U. S. A. Martin J. Quigley, President Edwin S. Clifford, Secretary George Clifford, Asst. Treasurer

Member Audit Bureau of Circulations Copyright, 1929, by Quigley Publishing Company All editorial and business correspondence should be addressed to the Chicago office Other publications: Better Theatres, devoted to construction, equipment and operation of theatres; published every fourth week as supplement to Exhibitors Herald- World; The Motion Picture Almanac, Pictures and Personalities, pub- lished annually; The Chicagoan and Polo, Class publications.

Whole Vol. 94, No. 1 (Vol. 36, No. 4) January 5, 1929

Quality Test

THE exact status of the question of interchangeability among sound picture devices, from both a practicable and a permissible standpoint, is revealed in the following statement just issued by Mr. J. E. Otterson. president of Electrical Research Products, Inc.:

"We have just reached an understanding with the pro- ducers licensed by us that they will play their productions on any equipment which in their judgment gives results of satisfactory quality. If they find, or we demonstrate, that the equipment is not up to standard, then they will cease to serve such equipment."

Here, then, is the latest word, and it is a word of such definiteness that it admits of no misunderstanding. The Western Electric Company interests- are not standing in the way of the freest, fullest and earliest development in the use of sound pictures. The insistence upon quality reproduction is only the insistence that the industry unitedly must make. The present standards, and con- stantly bettering standards, obviously must be the common objective of both exhibitors and producers if the public's present interest in sound pictures is to be developed into a substantial and lasting patronage.

* * *

The Name Hunt

THE merry discussion looking to the christening of the talking picture goes on. During the past week all branches of the industry, together with a large public rep- resentation, have busied themselves with thought and dis- cussion about an appropriate name for the talking picture.

There is no scarcity of suggestions. Words and combina- tions of words of many kinds and descriptions have been proposed. Unfortunately, too many of them are severely and forbiddingly Greek and Latin. These may be sound enough in their derivation but they simply will never fit into the popular tongue of the day.

Mr. Jack Warner offers a short-cut to a solution of the problem with the suggestion that the brand name, "Vita- phone," be the elected term. Similarly, Mr. Louis B. Mayer advocates, "Movietone." One thing that may be noted in connection with both of these suggestions is that Vitaphone and Movietone are words that already are deep

in the language of the theatregoing public. The public is not using the terms exactly; in other words, they are not using them in a brand-name sense but are employing them to refer generally to talking pictures.

We do not know the precise origination of "Vitaphone."' It was offered by Warner Brothers at the birth of the syn- chronized picture to describe Warner Brothers' sound and picture entertainments. It may have been suggested by "Vitagraph," the name of the pioneer company absorbed sev eral years ago by the Warner Brothers.

"Vitaphone" is a fine, upstanding term and it could very consistently if brand name considerations would not pre- vent— become a creditable word for the public and the trade to use in referring to talking pictures.

We understand that "Movietone"' is the personal inven- tion of Mr. William Fox. It has been used from the start by the Fox company in connection with its synchronized and talking pictures. This word has already gone far with the public. The combination of "tone"' with "movie" re- moves much of the objectionableness of the latter term when used alone. The coined term, 'Movietone,"' has much to recommend it. It rolls easily into the language of the day and. as is the case with "Vitaphone." it is already in wide use by the public.

However, until the ballots are counted we continue to urge consideration of the term AT DIEN.

"Allied States' Head

THE election of Mr. Abram F. Myers, now chairman of the Federal Trade Commission, as president and gen- eral counsel of the Allied States Association of Motion Picture Exhibitors is a development that may be regarded with widespread satisfaction. While it has not yet been made plain as to just how soon Mr. Myers may be released by the President from his official duties at Washington, it is to be hoped that his efforts in behalf of the exhibitors may be taken up at an early date so that the many imme- diate and pressing problems may have the benefit of his attention.

The election of Mr. Myers is really the outcome of sev- eral vears* agitation among exhibitors for the selection of a strong and experienced personality from outside the in- dustry to head an association. There is regret that such an arrangement had not been made earlier but there is gratification in the fact that at least now it has been done.

It is not yet timely to comment generally on the plans of the Allied States Association under the leadership of Mr. Myers because thus far an official statement referring in any detail to the plans and purposes of the new arrange- ment has not been issued. But it is timely to congratulate Mr. Myers and the association jointly on the new arrange- ment.

Exhibitors certainly are entitled to, and certainly need, the benefits of a strong and active association. And such an association requires the full time and attention of a chief executive who is expert and experienced with respect to the problems and necessities involved.

Mr. Myers made an excellent impression upon the motion picture industry generally during the time of conducting a trade practice conference. This will be an advantage to him in setting out on his new duties. Also, he has behind him a creditable and convincing record generally and is plainly qualified to play an important part in entrenching and rendering more secui-e the business of exhibiting mo- tion pictures.

The best wishes of the Herald-World are extended to Mr. Myers and to the Allied States Association.

—MARTIN J. QUIGLEY.

January 5, 1929

EXHIBITORS HERALD - WORLD

21

Audien Drive Is Creating Wide Public Interest in Talking Motion Pictures

An

Entire Industry Must Decide

—The

EXHIBITOR

—The

PRODUCER

—The

DISTRIBUTOR

—The

STAR

—The

DIRECTOR

—The

SCENARIST

—The

ADVERTISING MAN

—The

PUBLICIST

—The

PROJECTIONIST

—The

CAMERAMAN

—The

TECHNICIAN

ALL must join in selecting a name which reflects properly and ap- propriately the dignity and im- portance of the Talking Picture.

The campaign seeking a decent name for motion pictures that have found their voice, to supplant such unhappy designations as "talkies," "speakies." "soundies," and some even more undignified, has progressed far beyond expectations.

Not that the rose has found its name! True, there are some who like audien, suggested by the Herald- World, but there are others who believe it too obviously manufactured, not to say highbrow. There are others who like cinelog. the sug- gestion of a Greek purist at Columbia university. There are others who like dramaphone. pictovox. audifilm, just as there are some who root for 'talkies"' and "speakies!"

And there are more names pouring in all tbe time, from many sections of the countrv.

* * *

Even though no name has icon universal approval as yet, the campaign has had extraordinary success in interesting the public in the new pictures com- bining screen and sound. The leading critics of the country have taken up the cry and the HERALD-lTORLD's campaign has been commented upon by Quinn Martin in the New 1 ork World. F. Mordaunt Hall in the New York limes. Robert Sherwood in the New York Evening Post. Ashton Stevens in the Chicago Herald and Examiner, and others too numerous to mention. This enlisting of the public interest, through the important press, has pro- vided exhibitors through the country with an entirely new and refreshing exploi- tation angle. Thus it may be said with truth that the campaign has been eminently successful, whether it ever succeeds in erasing "talkies" from the slanguage of the day or not.

Several new and highly promising suggestions have come forward.

Milton Silver, advertising manager of I niversal. icho knows the public mind, comes forth with the suggestion . . . Photovoice. As a standardized term to describe talking pictures, photovoice has the virtues of simplicity, ease, familiarity. Try it . . . Photovoice.

A whole series of promising suggestions comes from Richard L. Moss, assistant manager with the Loew organization. He makes one highlv promising sugges- tion . . . Phonoplay. This is close to a term already in good repute, photoplay. Obviously, if a photoplay is a play presented on the screen in motion pictures, then phonoplay is a play presented in sound, with every suggestion of the motion picture.

Quinn Martin, particularly good-natured on the eve of a six weeks' vaca- tion in Europe, beginning in Rerlin and the I fa studios, is u illing to try audien. This, from a critic, is quite a concession, though Martin will prob- ably come back uith something faintly resembling Sprachkino. or Schicetz- bilder. (Where's that German type anyway?)

^^llclt JVflniC Do YOU ^OD Sherwood, whose position anywhere would naturally be one of eminence.

suggests in the New 1 ork Evening Post and 35 other newspapers through the SUGGEST? country that the Herald-World's campaign would add considerable class to the

language. "I have lately seen several delightful audiens." Sherwood imagines

himself saying, "audiens including 'Sal of Singapore." 'Noisy Neighbors,' and

'State Street Sadie.' "

Joseph I. Schnitzer. president of F B 0 Productions, finds a similar difficulty

NAME with audien. He considers this classy little designation a bit too highbrow.

"The motion picture fan does not icant a icord u ith which he is not famil-

ADDRESS iar, and above all. he does not want a name for anything thrust down his

throat," said Mr. Schnitzer. "any more than he wants a star forced on him.

CITY and STATE The fans want to coin their own names for their entertainment and make

their own stars. Although 'talkie' is cheap and slangy. I am afraid it is here [Fill in coupon and mail to EXHIBITORS 10 s'av> much like 'movie.' Personally. I don't like it. but I dont think there

HERALD-WORLD, 407 South Dearborn St., is anything we can do about it."

Chicago, III.'] The returns are not yet all in. And just as Herbert Hoover managed to break

the Solid South so may audien or cinelog or photovoice or phonoplay succeed in . breaking the Solid Talkie. Ballots always welcome.

22

EXHIBITORS HERALD-WORLD

January 5, 1929

What Is Your Suggestion?

Should the talking picture be called a "talkie," a "speakie," a "squawkie," or some more dignified name? Your opinion, please!

PHOTOVOICE Milton Silver

Advertising manager Universal Pictures

L. P. Gorman Portland

Me.

AUDI EN

Second by Quinn Martin New York World

Clell Jay

Eureka Springs Ark.

AUDIO-PL AY

PHONO-PLAY

AUDIO PICTURES

AUDOMOTO

AU DIVISION

PHONO-ART

AUDI FILM

SONOFILM

PICTOPHONE Richard L. Moss Assistant Manager Loew Organization

VIEWTONE

VUTONE

VUCON

KODOR

KOVOX

VOCAM

MOVIX

Edward L. Klein

Edward L. Klein

Corp.

TALKIE

Eugene Arnstein Mihvaukee Theatre Circuit Milwaukee

Stanley Gross Downer theatre Milwaukee

Rheinhold Wallach Lake theatre Milwaukee

* * *

PICTALK

PICTORAL

VITAVOX

John T. Jackson

Coldwater

Mich.

* * *

PHONO-PHOTOS FONOFOTOS

M. B. Hornbeck

Logansport

Ind.

* * *

AUDIES

—P. A. Wills Champaign 111

KENTONE VIST ATONE Easton West Ocean Park Cal.

* * *

DRAM AT ONE —Frank C. Ely Morristown N. J.

HUMANITONE —F. K. Haskell Portland Ore.

* * *

VOCAPHOTOS —W. S. G. Heath Edgefield

s. c.

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SYMPHONY PICTURES